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How to Effectively Negotiate During a Job Interview

How to Effectively Negotiate During a Job Interview

The very thought of an interview is unnerving, not to mind negotiating with HR recruiters around the salary or terms for the impending job. The interview itself can be demanding enough on mental capability when considering the rigorous questions that may be asked throughout the interview.

Image by Gerd Altmann from Pixabay

Typically the conversation of salary, holiday days, terms and non-financial package will be talked about toward the end of the final interview. By this stage, fatigue may have set in which can impact mental capacity to negotiate more assertively. At this stage of the process the assistance of experts in negotiation can be the ideal solution to achieving satisfactory results.

Recruitment Agency professionals can be more adept with negotiating terms on behalf of the potential candidate for the job. They practice this technique regularly for their client base, which can involve a lot of ‘toing-and-froing’ in the consultations between the HR recruiter and the Recruitment Agency. Enlisting the expertise of this profession can be invaluable. If dialogue with the recruiter is clear and terms are confirmed in advance, then it can mean the difference between securing a satisfactory job contract and terms versus taking what was offered.  Some people turn down jobs they have really wanted because they did not negotiate the right salary and package.  

The terms and conditions being sought need to be discussed and agreed in consultation with the agency recruiter, prior to the interview. This can provide the jobseeker with increased confidence that the package being offered will be in line with personal expectations.  It can also save time and money, by choosing not to attend an interview if the salary is inadequate.

It must be said that since the day we started talking, we were learning the art of negotiating with our parents. Without realising it we were skilfully crafting favourable outcomes for ourselves – as toddlers, tweenies’ and teenagers. We might have said to our parents: if I eat all of my dinner can I have some treats after.

The ideal situation of any negotiation is to create a ‘win-win’ scenario, resulting in a favourable outcome for both parties involved. Of course it has to be realistic and fair. Investing in our self-development is important in this area, if we prefer to act on our own behalf. Improving these skills can significantly help us to negotiate salary and terms of employment or in any other endeavour in life.