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Invest in Successful Networking – The People You Know

Invest in Successful Networking – The People You Know

Successful networking is an on-going long-term process to build up mutually supportive relationships. Supportive networks can include; family, friends, work colleagues, supervisors/managers and professionals. The key to fostering connections is to be respectful, genuine, trusting, considerate and consistent on all interactions, while appreciating the value of investing in a balanced and healthy give-and-take relationship.

Author a famous quote, Maya Angelou, states: “I’ve learned that people will forget what you said, people will forget what you did, but people will never forget how you made them feel”. On reflection, this statement reveals that emotions have a huge part to play in developing solid and potentially life-long connections with people that possess similar and diverse interests to us.

Understanding that the right support networks can take us out of our comfort zone, and help propel us to the next level of our career, which is important for constructive change. People can motivate us further than we could ever achieve when operating solo.

Effective listening can produce positive insights on the feedback that is freely given, only when the receiver is open to hearing the reflective conversation. Honest assessments in relationships can provide us with a mirror that potentially reflects our positive and negative attributes. Sincerity through constructive and mutual non-judgemental analysis is vital for beneficial insights to flow both ways in the friendship.

At times some feedback may hit a raw nerve and push us back to reach for our comfort-blanket. One way to overcome this is to look at the comments without the attachment of old emotions, by recognising that we can accept or store the comment for additional insights at a later date, to confirm if it is true or false. The answer will come when we are ready for it, and will resonate with us.

Evaluation of supportive networking connections is important to help realise if there is value for both people in the on-going relationship. Asking the right questions can provide clarity on future endeavours, such as: is this right job for me. For example, asking: if a job in nursing would suit my personality and do I have the required skills, can provide such clarity before investing time and effort in making the application. 

Healthy and constructive feedback is a sure sign that the connection between both parties is built on openness, mutual trust and good-will for prosperity in the other halves life. Whether in our work and personal lives, we all need people who have our best interests at heart. While they can be rare to find, it is worth exploring different avenues to acquire varied opinions in collaborative relationships that can help us find our true north.

Click here to find out more why networking is important for your career.

Back to Study While Working Full-Time

Back to Study While Working Full-Time

As employers demand an increasing range of skills in their employees and continuing professional development is becoming more important, many professionals are going back to college to get the specific expertise they need for a new job, for a promotion, or, in some cases, to retain their current position. Once you have decided why you want to go back to study, you need to be prepared.  Work life balance will never be more important as you try to balance study life with work life.  Here is a short list of what you need to organise:

back to study while working full time

1)     Talk to your manager – Before making a decision about what to study or where to attend, get some advice from your manager about how your continuing professional education can contribute to the success of the company.

2)     Talk to your colleagues who have gone back to school – Discussing your plans with colleagues who have experience with returning to school will give you a better idea about what to expect and what to avoid.

3)     Come up with a time management plan – Draw up a time budget that will help you figure out when you can study given your work and family commitments.

4)     Ensure that your commitment to your course doesn’t overshadow your commitment to your job – While your employer might be supportive of your decision to go back to school they still expect you to be fully productive on the job.

5)     Align your course work with your career work – Most academic programs should have enough flexibility and discretion in assignments that will give you opportunities to tackle work-related projects or problems.

6)     Develop a professional network with your classmates – Don’t skimp on the social side of college or school, getting to know your classmates and professors will expand your network, and may be a big chunk of the upside of going back to school.

Source: www.forbes.com