Have you heard of ECPD – job seekers free courses?

Have you heard of job seekers free courses?  At Three Q PERMS & TEMPS we offer free interview services to jobseekers as part of our company’s CSR. Due to this we are often contacted by other companies who also offer help or services to jobseekers. I would like to introduce you to Sean Griffin.

Sean Griffin is an entrepreneur based in Galway in the West of Ireland.  Sean graduated from the National University of Ireland in Galway, where he studied Commerce and graduated with an honours degree, specialising in Human Resource Management and Marketing.

In 2008 Sean founded ECPD www.ECPD.ie.  ECPD was to address the need for the provision of quality training through a flexible online delivery. The design, development and the delivery of online training for the Security Industry is what ECPD specialises in. ECPD also provides general courses which are relevant to all other industries. They offer three employability courses which has been of great assistance to current jobseekers.

job-seekers free courses

These three courses are:

o CV Preparation Course

o Interview Preparation Course

o Start Your Own Business Course

These three courses are completely free of charge and can be accessed by:

1. Registering with ecpd.ie

2. Choosing one of the above courses

3. Inputting the enrolment key – recruitment

Not only has Sean achieved all of the above but he has also worked with the Irish Defence Forces. He has provided guidance to retiring personnel on the training that they can avail of. This is done so that they can develop a second career within the Security Industry. This is facilitated through presentations given to Pre-retirement Courses held nationwide for the Defence Forces.

In 2016 Sean launched Security Upskill – www.securityupskill.com. The focus of this was on the provision of online training purely for the Security Industry worldwide. Security Upskill offers over 40 courses relating to the Security Industry and these range from beginner courses for individuals who want to break into the Security Industry or for existing employees within the Security Industry looking to enhance their current skills.

Sean’s aim and goal is to become the number one online training source for both jobseekers and the Security Industry globally.

We wish Sean the very best in his quest and we love to see how so many work together to get people back into employment.

How to Choose the right Job Path

How to choose the correct job path is a big question for those stuck in jobs they hate, or those are just looking to find some meaning in what they do.  It can be daunting.  Research suggests that human beings are remarkably bad at predicting how they will feel when doing something in the future. It’s not hard to find someone who started out thinking that they would love their chosen profession, only to wind up hating it. In fairness, how are you supposed to know if you will be happy as an investment banker, or an artist, or a professor, if you haven’t actually done any of these things yet? Who has ever, in the history of mankind, taken a job and had it turn out exactly as they imagined it would? So if passion and expected happiness can’t be your guides, what can be?

how to choose the right job path

Well, you can begin by choosing a career that fits well with your skills and values. Since you actually have some sense of what those are (hopefully), this is a good starting place. But a bit less obviously — though just as important — you also want to choose an occupation that provides a good motivational fit for you as well.  Knowing your dominant focus, you can now evaluate how well-suited you are motivationally to different kinds of careers, or different positions in your organisation.

Some questions to consider to help you figure out the correct job path are;

If I could choose someone to trade places with, it would be…..

My co-workers always say I’m great at……… because I’m……..

If my manager would let me, I’d do more of…………….

More than a decade of research shows that when people experience a fit between their own motivation and the way they work, they are not only more effective, but they also find their work more interesting and engaging, and value it more.

Why not check out our current roles here:

The Importance of Checking the Salary When Applying for Jobs

It’s usually considered taboo but the importance of of checking the salary when applying for jobs is a hugely underrated check point.  We say,  of course you should check the salary before committing your time.  However, for some inexplicable reason, the convention is typically not to raise the topic until the interviewer does, or at least until you’re further along in the process.  That doesn’t mean that you can’t do it  earlier. While some employers will be completely fine with it, others will be a little weird about it, because you’re taking the timeline for raising it out of their hands (God forbid!) and they see themselves as the ones controlling the process.  So read on for our suggestions on how to raise the thorny subject the masterful way.
the importance of checking the salary when applying for jobs

Top tips for asking about the salary in the interview process:

1)      Decide that you’re willing to risk putting them off because it’s important enough to you to know up-front. In this case, you’d say something like this:  “I hope you don’t mind me asking at this stage, but because it’s difficult for me to take time off work to interview, is it possible to give me a sense of the salary range so that we can make sure we’re in the same ballpark before we move forward?

2)      Decide that you’re not willing to risk putting them off and that you’ll invest the time in finding out more about the employer and the job, even though there’s a chance that you’ll be too far apart on salary. After all, if the salary ends up not being right, you still might have made useful contacts and could be considered for other jobs there in the future.

3)      A third path is to do your own research on what similar positions in your industry and geographic area typically pay, and simply assume that they’re going to be in that range. (You’ve hopefully done this type of research already and are basing your expectations on it anyway, right?)

Why not take a look at some of our current roles:

www.3qrecruitment.ie/home/

Source: http://www.askamanager.org/

How to Spot a Hostile Work Environment

A hostile work environment is prohibited by law and is intimidating and/or offensive.  So how do you spot a hostile work environment? Unfortunately, it’s all down to company culture.

Some employees believe that a bad boss, an unpleasant work environment, a rude co-worker, or the lack of perks, privileges, benefits, and recognition can create a hostile work environment. But, the reality is that for a workplace to be hostile, certain legal criteria must be met. Additionally, the behaviour, actions or communication must be discriminatory in nature.

How to spot a hostile work environment

So, a co-worker who talks loudly, snaps her gum, and leans over your desk when she talks with you, is demonstrating inappropriate, rude, obnoxious behaviour, but it does not create a hostile work environment. On the other hand, a co-worker who tells sexually explicit jokes and sends around images of nude people, is guilty of sexual harassment and creating a hostile work environment.

A boss who verbally berates you about your age, your religion, your gender, or your race may be guilty of creating a hostile work environment. This is especially true if you asked the individual to stop and the behaviour continues.

You can read some of our tips for creating a positive working environment over here.  For anyone who may need help dealing with a difficult situation regarding behaviour in the workplace, visit reachout.com for advice.

Or… why not just change job? Take a look at some of our great new roles if you have become tired with your job: www.3qrecruitment.ie/home/Source: humanresources.about.com

Tips for a Positive Work Environment

I love my job.  Here are some tips for a positive working environment (if you don’t) because there’s nothing worse that working in a job you hate, or worse, in a hostile work environment. A workplace that is trusting, open and fun will be the most productive and successful. It’s all about the company culture.
Tips for a positive working environment

1. Engage in meaningful (and in-person) dialogue

When you make the effort to connect with your team members in person—individually and as a group—you’re establishing a position of caring that motivates individuals in all sorts of crazy-good ways. It’s easy to send short messages in emails, and then rely on these small exchanges for most of your communication. Or, you can focus on what needs to get done next and forget to take a breath, look around, and get to know your employees. Don’t fall into this rut. Instead, ask your team members about their immediate goals and project interests as well as their career objectives.

Also, remember: We’re all human, and most humans respond well to the real thing—in-person communication that says “you matter.”

2. Show your appreciation

One of the biggest complaints from employees is that they don’t feel appreciated. It takes no effort to say “thank you” for example. They are the two most underrated words in the dictionary.  The second someone gives us a “nice job” or “you made a difference on this project,” it makes us feel like we matter in a way that gives our work a sense of purpose. If you’re not so inclined to give out verbal gold stars, an easy place to start is with a simple “thank you.”

The next step is to give meaningful appreciation. Thread the high-fives and “nice jobs” with a more detailed picture behind your acknowledgment. This way, your employees can understand what they’re doing well, and do more of it. Also, detailed praise shows you’re paying attention and not throwing around empty phrases. When people feel like they’re doing good work, they want to rise to the occasion even more.

3. Listen to everyone’s ideas

Your entire team has great ideas. They’re in the trenches all day, bringing their own experience and perspectives to the part of the project they’re focused on. For example, if there’s a way to make spreadsheets more efficient or cold-calls more productive, the team members know how. It’s tempting to stick with protocol because you know that works well. But these days the world moves so fast nobody can afford to stay with a status quo for too long. So instead, make it a policy to listen to new ideas (you could structure appropriate time periods for this, too), and this will tell everyone they’re a valuable part of the team. Give the good ideas a try; you never know what might happen—other than the team becomes more invested in their work and the project outcome, for starters.

4. Trust your team members

This is a harder rule to practice for some more than others. So try to default to the assumption that your team is made up of adult, responsibility-taking, competent workers that don’t need to be treated like children. (In the end, people act the way they’re treated.) In action terms, this means that when you delegate, really let go and let the individual own the task you gave them. You can also communicate trust by asking team members to make decisions for their part of the project, like:

  • Suggesting when and if meetings should happen
  • Anticipating road blocks and communicate those to the group
  • Assuming that your team wants the best for the project. And if you sense the beginnings of some negative juju kicking up, invite  discussions about office policy; see what the majority thinks.

5. Be spontaneous and have a little fun

Everyone wants to have fun at work—even though everyone defines “fun” a little differently. Still, if you can keep the previous four tips in action, then fun—or a sense of enjoyment and being able to be yourself at work—becomes a more natural part of everyone’s job. Fun happens when  people feel well-connected with a team where there’s mutual respect, open communication, acceptance of who people are and everyone’s collaborating and working toward the same goal. When teams are working well together, it makes it easier to be spontaneous and have some fun – whether it’s a last-minute Football Friday party after a project launch, or a brief pause in the afternoon to tell stories and have a few laughs over topics that have nothing to do about work.

Source: www.liquidplanner.com/blog/5-ways-to-create-a-positive-work-environment/

Back to Study While Working Full-Time

Back to Study While Working Full-Time

As employers demand an increasing range of skills in their employees and continuing professional development is becoming more important, many professionals are going back to college to get the specific expertise they need for a new job, for a promotion, or, in some cases, to retain their current position. Once you have decided why you want to go back to study, you need to be prepared.  Work life balance will never be more important as you try to balance study life with work life.  Here is a short list of what you need to organise:

back to study while working full time

1)     Talk to your manager – Before making a decision about what to study or where to attend, get some advice from your manager about how your continuing professional education can contribute to the success of the company.

2)     Talk to your colleagues who have gone back to school – Discussing your plans with colleagues who have experience with returning to school will give you a better idea about what to expect and what to avoid.

3)     Come up with a time management plan – Draw up a time budget that will help you figure out when you can study given your work and family commitments.

4)     Ensure that your commitment to your course doesn’t overshadow your commitment to your job – While your employer might be supportive of your decision to go back to school they still expect you to be fully productive on the job.

5)     Align your course work with your career work – Most academic programs should have enough flexibility and discretion in assignments that will give you opportunities to tackle work-related projects or problems.

6)     Develop a professional network with your classmates – Don’t skimp on the social side of college or school, getting to know your classmates and professors will expand your network, and may be a big chunk of the upside of going back to school.

Source: www.forbes.com

Thinking About Training to Become a Chef?

Are you thinking About Training to Become a Chef?  Find out what it’s really like working in the Catering Industry in Ireland.

thinking about training to become a chef

1.       Constant heat and noise can be stressful and make people short-tempered. Someone working in a kitchen for the first time can feel a mix of anything from nervousness to downright terror for their work colleagues during the initial learning spell. Don’t worry, this passes and soon you’ll forget you ever felt this way –that is until one day you catch the glance of fear the new Commis chef gives you.

2.       Working in a Michelin-starred restaurant will default as your career goal. Working in those rare kitchens which produce small numbers at high prices is always fantastic, but you’ll come to realise that gaining knowledge in the art of translating complexity and quality to a good level of volume and profit will nearly always make you a more valuable professional.

3.       You will have cuts, burns and open wounds on your hands and arms mostly all of the time. You’ll go from being slightly embarrassed about it to feeling like a total badass.

4.       Speaking of burns, hot showers will be painful.

5.       Don’t expect time off for birthdays, weddings or anniversaries. Your kitchen team will come to need you more than your family do. In some cases you might even start to think of them AS your family.

6.       You’ll either become chubby or lose a heap of weight.

7.       It will become incredibly difficult to watch friends or love ones cook.

8.       Whether it be coffee, Red Bull or jellybabies, you will develop an addiction of some kind.

9.       People will think that you must banquet like a king, but honestly you willnever prepare nice meals for yourself – you’ll be too tired and fed up of being in the kitchen. In fact, you will consume most of your food out of the bottom of a saucepan hunched over a bin.

10.   You will develop a macabre obsession with knives. Or spoons, if you’re a Pastry Chef.

11.   Good quality produce will make you feel genuine love for the planet.

12.   Calling in sick for work is a moral lapse as clear and embarrassing as stealing from charity. It’s a matter of pride for chefs. At some point in your career you’ll see your Head Chef work the passe for ten hours so woozy they can barely stand. Unless you’re deathly bedridden, you’re expected to be there.

13.   You will spend all of your money on cookbooks and speciality tools.

14.   Your Mam will apologise every time she cooks for you.

15.   Types of people you’d even never imagined talking to will become your closest friends.

16.   You’ll develop KILLER leg muscles from standing 12 hours a day.

17.   Crazy endorphin highs will hit you after Saturday night service that will leave you unable to sleep for hours.

18.   Your friends will joke that you’re a member of MI5 as you’ve burned off most of your fingerprints

19.   If you are the right person, you’ll never ever dream of doing anything else.

Tips on Dealing With Job Rejection

Dealing with job rejection is never easy, and when you’ve been sending out job application after application only to receive rejection letters back, it’s very easy to get discouraged. But don’t lose hope, we’ve put together some tips on dealing with job rejection. As hard as it can be to take, rejection is a normal part of the job-hunting process and will help you to learn and grow. Learn from your mistakes and make every rejection lead you one step closer to a job offer.

Tips on Dealing With Job Rejection

  1. Don’t take it personally – there are usually a variety of factors that play into a hiring manager’s decision-making process.
  2. Focus on your strengths – it’s all about finding the right fit.
  3. Do other things that make you feel good – Like walking, swimming etc.
  4. Treat job-hunting as a job – give yourself a schedule and stick to it, and give yourself breaks.
  5. Keep the faith – Keep reminding yourself that rejection is a natural part of the process, everyone experiences it and landing a job is really just a numbers game. Some luck is required.

Find your new job right here:

www.3qrecruitment.ie/current-jobs/

Source www.careerfaqs.com.au

You might also like to learn about some free job seeker courses.

The Digital Job Search – Part 2- using LinkedIn for job seekers

The digital job search continues from our first article.  This time we are looking using the social networking for professionals platform, LinkedIn for job seekers.
 the digital job search using linkedin for job seekers

How does social networking fit into your regular networking – and how is it different?

These questions have been asked of industry experts who draw the line between your personal and public digital footprint. Your LinkedIn professional profile should eliminate personal information and concentrate mainly on your career experience, your community service, and your professional accomplishments.

On LinkedIn, you can search for people you know (or want to connect with) but you can also use it to research companies. What social media sites do that can’t be done in person is show you how everyone in your company or city is connected. This could not possibly be done in a once off meeting face to face with someone but after, when you have connected with them on LinkedIn, it will expose those connections in a few clicks.  If you want to get to know someone inside a company, social media is the way to go.

Come visit our site for the latest available positions: www.3qrecruitment.ie/home/

The Digital Job Search for job seekers – Job Boards

The Digital Job Search for job seekers – Part 1 – Jobs Boards

There is no denying the Internet has rapidly become one of the most important tools for job seekers, as more and more digital job search resources have become available and even mobile-optimised. If you are not using online resources during your search, you are part of a minority. Just like any other career endeavour, job seekers need to be equipped with a set of skills to help you succeed in your job search:

The Digital Job Search for job seekers - Job Boards

1)      Organising Your Digital Job Search – Maintaining an ordered search will reduce the amount of time you spend trawling the internet.

2)      Knowing Your Toolkit – Look at the tools you have at your disposal, and identify the best and worst uses for each one.

3)      Using Your Social Media Accounts – Your job seeker online presence has more of an impact than you think during your digital job search. The activity on your accounts should be an extension of your professional side. Do not post images that may be compromising as these are easily traceable now.

4)      Finding Your Calling – So your vague searches are yielding way too many postings with little substance. What to do? Be specific. Be discerning. Be confident. Have a look at our post about finding the right job path for you.  You can read part two of this article by clicking here.

Why not check out our current jobs on our site: www.3qrecruitment.ie/home/

Source: https://careershift.com