The Role Of  A Hotel Duty Manager

The role of  a hotel duty manager is a job title that you may often see on job listings but what does it mean?  Here at Three Q we have a wealth of knowledge when it comes matching hotel duty manager with their perfect employer. So if you’re curious as to what the role requires and what a hotel duty manager does on a day-to-day basis, read on.

The role of a hotel duty manager is to make sure the hotel runs smoothly when the General manager is unavailable. It is a busy role with plenty of responsibility. A candidate for this position must be ready to deal with any situation that may arise and deal with it in a calm professional manner. A Duty Manger must be willing to work in a fast paced environment and command the team under them efficiently.

In the hotel business it isn’t always possible for a General Manager to be present, therefore a Duty Manager acts on behalf of them, making managerial decisions when they are needed.  The Duty manager will look after the running of the business while on duty ensuring business runs as smoothly as possible.

Responsibilities of a Duty Manager

the role of a hotel duty manager three q recruitment agency dublin

Within the role of Duty Manager comes a lot of responsibility from over seeing the day to day business and managing your team.  Of course, the main responsibility is to make sure all the guests are satisfied with the hotel’s service. The Duty Manager is responsible for any issues that may occur while on duty, and it is their job to resolve the issue in a professional manner.

The Hours of a Hotel Duty Manger

The hours of a Duty Manager can vary depending on size of hotel and location You will have to work when the General Manager isn’t present.  A duty manager can work around thirty to forty hours per week .

Salary of a Duty Manager

the role of a hotel duty manager three q recruitment agency dublin

A duty Manager’s salary will depend on a variety of things such as, education and training, experience and the location of the hotel.

Having knowledge on how a hotel works is essential. In Ireland it is recommended to require a bachelor’s degree in a hospitality course. There are many courses that are helpful to have when applying for work in the hospitality industry.  A general business can also be sufficient.  Although have formal training can be beneficial, you can still become a hotel duty manager by gaining experience and applying to work in entry level positions in the hotel. It is possible to start from the bottom and working yourself up the ladder in the hospitality industry.

If becoming a Duty Manager interests you or if you are currently a Duty Manager looking for a new position, keep an eye on our listings that we are constantly updating with new job opportunities in the industry. If you are an employer and are wishing to advertise your job in our listings, please email sales@3reqruitment.ie or phone +353 1878 3335.

The Life Of A Sous Chef In A Five Star Hotel

Ever wondered what the life of a sous chef in a five star hotel is like? Here at Three Q we have 19 years of experience in helping sous chef’s and culinary staff to find their dream job. Here at Three Q we’re a hands on recruitment team who work to match our clients with the perfect Sous Chef for the job.  How hands on are we? We go out on site on help to train our temps and perms so that they have a great start to their new job. Our consultants are ex hospitality professionals, we undertake training in healthcare and hospitality training and we have served at events. We know what it’s like to be a Sous Chef in a busy Dublin 5 star hotel. so if you’d like to know more, so if you want to know what the life of a sous chef in a five star hotel is like, read on to find out more.

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How To Advance Your Career As A Staff Nurse

One thing that we are often asked here at Three Q is how to advance your career as a staff nurse. This month we are celebrating Three Q’s 19th birthday, so you know that we have years of experience in helping Staff Nurses to advance their careers. You may love your job as a staff nurse, but sometimes you may feel like you have more potential than your current position.So without any further ado, here are our top tips on how to advance your career as a staff nurse.

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Questions To Ask Yourself When Considering Moving Jobs

Moving for a job is by no means a small decision, and there are plenty of questions to ask yourself when considering moving jobs. If not just for your own peace of mind and knowing what’s right for you and what you want, but also if your current employer comes to you with a counter offer, you’ll know what the right decision is. Here at Three Q, we’re celebrating our 19th year in business this September, so we know that moving jobs isn’t just about more money, it’s also about your job satisfaction and work-life balance.

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How To Prepare For Your First Job After You Graduate

One thing that we always are asked here at Three Q is how to prepare for your first job after you graduate. Although you may have had a part time job before and have some experience in the workforce- your first ‘real’ job can be scary! Here at Three Q we have years of experience of helping new graduates to find their dream job and get on the career ladder. Now that Graduation season has begun, we have decided to put together our tips to prepare you for your first job after you graduate.

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The Best Questions To Ask Your Potential Boss At A Job Interview

Ever wondered what are the best questions to ask your potential boss at a job interview? Here at Three Q we’ve been helping Job Seekers to land their dream jobs and overcome interview stress for over 18 years, so we know a thing about interviews. Sometimes candidates can be great throughout the actual interview but get stumped when it comes to end and the interviewer ask if they have any questions. If you feel like this situation relates to you: you’re in luck. We’ve put together some sample questions to ask when it comes to it.

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Experience of a Fertility Nurse

Quite often, when one thinks about changing career or looking to get a similar position in the same industry, we think about the responsibilities involved and if our interests, skills and personality are well suited for it. We are focused on the task of gauging if we would like that job more than the one we currently hold.

It’s common for nurses to move into different units in the hospital. Staying in healthcare and for many, the same hospital means little has to be left to the imagination regarding the tasks they’ll be asked to do, the people they’ll be working with and the environment they’ll be working in. Knowing a lot about a job change like this means you can focus on other variables that are just as important – does the position involve shift work, the salary, the qualifications required.

A nurse I was speaking to was a midwife when she decided she wanted to become a Fertility nurse. Later, she reverted back to midwifery. I asked her a few questions about her experience:

I asked her why she moved into fertility nursing from midwifery. She enjoyed midwifery and she took this as a good indication that she would enjoy being a fertility nurse. The deciding difference was a preferred work schedule in fertility nursing. It allowed her to work shifts. Keeping many factors constant, in her instance the industry,  place of work and the area of work – pregnancy remained unchanged and this allowed her to make a decisione based on practicality.

Advice for a nurse moving into fertility nursing: Do your research on fertility nursing. Learn what training is necessary and learn what is involved in working as a fertility nursing.

Is training necessary to become a Fertility nurse?
Becoming a fertility nurse involves taking on more training. She told me you have to do an ultrasound course which isn’t required to become a midwife.

Why did she go back to midwifery?
Fertility nursing turned out to be different in some ways that didn’t appeal to her. The position was described as ‘very medical’ and required less interaction and relationship building with patients than in her role in midwifery. This was the difference that made all the difference.

It can be hard to know if another position in a different area is for you even with a lot of information related experience. Getting a strong understanding of the work you’re getting into will certainly make it easier. As the nurse I spoke to said, nurses should really think about why they want to move into another field.

UCD provides an ultrasound course for fertility nursing. Click below for more information:
http://www.ucd.ie/medicine/studywithus/graduatestudies/radiography/fullportfolio/graduatecertificatefertilityultrasound/

Preparing For Your First Job As A Nurse In Dublin

Preparing for your first job as a nurse can be daunting . Here at Three Q, we’ve been helping newly qualified nurses to get their first job for years, so we know just how nervous of a time it can be. Although it may seem scary, with team Three Q, you’re in safe hands, and you’re sure to get off to a great start. If you’ve just graduated from your nursing course and are about to start your first shift as a nurse, you should be feeling equal parts excitement and nervousness. The best way to combat your anxiety while your waiting to begin your first job is to prepare for success. Here at Three Q, we’ve put together our list of the most important things to remember as you begin your new job as a nurse in Dublin.

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CV Checklist with Three Q

Here at Three Q, we know a thing or two about CVs, so we’ve put together our ultimate CV checklist.  You may be interested in a job but does your CV have what it takes to get you through the application stage? Most recruiters won’t spend long looking at your CV, and research shows us that there is only a 16% chance of them reading your cover letter.

Employers receive hundreds of CVs for some positions. However, getting through to the interview stage is not quite as tough as you think. If you have your CV in order, you’re a step ahead- most CVs will be disregarded almost immediately if they’re not up to scratch. With just a small amount of time and commitment you can elevate your CV above the average. So with no further a-do, here is Three Q’s ultimate C.V. Checklist.

cv checklist with three q recruitment

Layout

  • A CV should never be longer than two A4 pages. The exception to this of course is if you are a senior executive with decades of experience. In this instance, you are allowed to stretch to three A4 pages. However, even though we want to keep our CV short and sweet, make sure there isn’t a lot of white space at the end of the second page- this makes it look as if you don’t have much to say about yourself.
  • When you’re working with Word Documents, go to the Page Layout menu and make the Page Margins are 1cm all around. This makes your CV look neater and easier to read.
  • Does it pass the ‘arm’s length’ test? This means it should be aesthetically pleasing and professional when you hold it at arm’s length in front of you.
  • Keep paragraphs are condensed to a few lines each. 5-6 lines are usually enough, this will help to keep you focused while writing too.
  • Instead of adding blocks of text, try using bullet points to list your attributes.
  • Keep the most relevant information on page one of the CV so that the recruiter glancing over it will add it to the interview pile.
  • Ensure all information about any particular topic is kept together and not spread out over the two pages- this just keeps the reader clear and focused.

 

Structure & Style

  • Begin your CV with a Personal Profile then talk about Key Skills, Employment History, Education and Hobbies and Interests in that order. It may be a good idea to swap Employment and Education around if your academic career is more impressive than your employment history to date or if you’ve just recently graduated.
  • It seems trivial, but there are certain fonts that look best on a CV. Arial and Times New Roman are generally considered best. Size 12 is recommended and size 14 and 16 is advisable for headings. Don’t use more than two fonts and stick to one if possible- your CV is supposed to be formal, not artistic.
  • Always boldunderline or italicise important information that you wish to be highlighted.
  • When listing information, use bullet points. This is especially useful under Key Skills.
  • Use positive, proactive language throughout your CV. For example, “Created a database to analyse and interpret the subject matter” instead of “Used a database to track the collected data.”- make the most of all your experiences.

 

Spelling & Grammar

  • It is recommended to not rely solely on Spell Check. If recruiters spot any mistakes in your CV it will be rejected. While Spell Check helps you find actual spelling mistakes, it doesn’t help find mistakes in context; i.e. ‘What is over their?” Some recruiters may see poor grammar as a sign of a sloppy worker which ruins your chances of being offered an interview. As well as reading through it yourself, ask someone else to cast their eyes over it. They will probably see things you’ve missed and might remember something about yourself that you forgot to include.
  • Be careful when using capitalisation. A common mistake people make on CVs is to write ‘Bsc’ instead of BSc when adding their Bachelor of Science degree. Also, remember that the names of roads, streets, places and companies should have the first letter capitalised.

 

Personal Details

  • Make sure that your name is at the top of the page in bold.
  • Make sure that you have your postal address and your email address clearly on the page. Use an email that looks professional that doesn’t include slang.
  • Add your mobile number. We recommend to only include your house telephone if you have added a proper answer machine message or else you have a housemate you can trust to take a message.
  • Social media information should also be added; particularly your LinkedIn profile. Be sure to ‘clean up’ your Facebook and Twitter accounts if necessary, make sure that you haven’t got posts including offensive or unprofessional behaviour or language.

Personal Profile

  • This should be placed beneath your Personal Details. A Personal Profile is used to prove you are qualified for the role and that you are the best candidate for the job.
  • Keep the profile short; 3-5 lines should be enough.
  • Get to the point but also showcase your experience and special skills in what is essentially a marketing pitch to the employer- you need to sell your skills.

Key Skills

  • Use this section to point out your main strengths.
  • All skills included MUST be related to the job opening in some way.
  • Stick to skills which are job-related and transferrable.
  • Some employers tend to focus on candidates with soft skills such as Teamwork, Communication, Leadership, Friendliness and Problem Solving. Try to add a brief sentence demonstrating your skill after each one has been listed.
  • If you have specialist knowledge in a field related to the job or if you speak a foreign language then include the details- extra skills could be the difference between you and the next candidate.

 

Employment History

  • List your past jobs chronologically with the latest role first- it is probably the most relevant to the one to the job that you are applying for now.
  • Include job title, name of company and the dates you started and finished.
  • While it is best if your dates include the months you began and ended the jobs,  just include the years if there are gaps of a couple of months between roles.
  • Given difficulty in the job market at the past few years, most employers understand that there may be small gaps between jobs.
  • Include the key responsibilities you had in each role.
  • Always look to be specific when adding in the achievements and outcomes of any job; quantify the results if you can. Instead of saying you helped the company make a profit; specify the level of profit: “Implemented cost cutting procedures that reduced the company’s stationery bill by 22% per annum.”- hard facts show that you can get the job done and know how to do it.
  • Include the new skills you learned in each job.
  • List your 3-4 most recent jobs only.

Education

  • List your qualifications/certificates/professional awards.
  •  Name the educational institution, full name of the course and the start & end dates of where you studied
  • Add the grade/degree classification where applicable.
  • Recent graduates should include the modules on their latest degree along with the name of their dissertation project- this will show your interest in the field where you can’t back it up with work experience.

 Hobbies & Interests

  • It is a good idea to include a wide range of interests as this suggests you are a well-rounded individual with the ability to relate to different people.
  • Do NOT stick to one or two interests as recruiters often see this as a sign of someone unable to mix in different circles; this is a problem as most Irish workplace consists of diverse cultures.
  • Make sure you include some active, group and social interests; it is important that you give the impression you’re able to get along with others. Too many ‘solo’ interests mark you out as an introvert, which isn’t overly helpful as an employer when you need a candidate to work as part of the team.
  • Show that you have a serious interest in at least one hobby as this suggests you have determination, concentration and willpower.
  • Try and include anything which shows the ability to lead others. If you want to climb the ladder, you need to be willing to take responsibility. An example of this is stating if you were were ever a team captain of a sports team, or a leader in a volunteering role.

References

  • You don’t need to add references unless they are specified on the job opening. ‘References added upon request’ is usually sufficient. If you are asked for them , keep them on a seperate sheet.
  • Always ask referees first to seek their permission- you don’t want to surprise them with a phone call from a stranger. Include their name, job title, address and phone number.

cv checklist with three q recruitment

Always include a cover letter with your CV, this provides insight into your personality and enables you to add details that are not on your CV. Make sure that you personalise it to each job opportunity which will also show the employer that you are really interested in working for them. Ensure there are no gaps in your employment history. If there are significant gaps, you can address them in your cover letter. Try to be positive about the gap; perhaps you were studying a course, travelling or else you needed to take a break to focus on a career change. You don’t need to be too specific at this stage; that can wait for the interview. Assuming you are sending your CV by email to an online recruiter, make sure that all the hyperlinks work.

If you go through the above checklist carefully, you should have all the information you need to create a standout CV. Once you have it written up, take a look at our listings to check out all of the job posts that we update daily.