The Importance of Checking the Salary When Applying for Jobs

It’s usually considered taboo but the importance of of checking the salary when applying for jobs is a hugely underrated check point.  We say,  of course you should check the salary before committing your time.  However, for some inexplicable reason, the convention is typically not to raise the topic until the interviewer does, or at least until you’re further along in the process.  That doesn’t mean that you can’t do it  earlier. While some employers will be completely fine with it, others will be a little weird about it, because you’re taking the timeline for raising it out of their hands (God forbid!) and they see themselves as the ones controlling the process.  So read on for our suggestions on how to raise the thorny subject the masterful way.
the importance of checking the salary when applying for jobs

Top tips for asking about the salary in the interview process:

1)      Decide that you’re willing to risk putting them off because it’s important enough to you to know up-front. In this case, you’d say something like this:  “I hope you don’t mind me asking at this stage, but because it’s difficult for me to take time off work to interview, is it possible to give me a sense of the salary range so that we can make sure we’re in the same ballpark before we move forward?

2)      Decide that you’re not willing to risk putting them off and that you’ll invest the time in finding out more about the employer and the job, even though there’s a chance that you’ll be too far apart on salary. After all, if the salary ends up not being right, you still might have made useful contacts and could be considered for other jobs there in the future.

3)      A third path is to do your own research on what similar positions in your industry and geographic area typically pay, and simply assume that they’re going to be in that range. (You’ve hopefully done this type of research already and are basing your expectations on it anyway, right?)

Why not take a look at some of our current roles:

www.3qrecruitment.ie/home/

Source: http://www.askamanager.org/

How to Spot a Hostile Work Environment

A hostile work environment is prohibited by law and is intimidating and/or offensive.  So how do you spot a hostile work environment? Unfortunately, it’s all down to company culture.

Some employees believe that a bad boss, an unpleasant work environment, a rude co-worker, or the lack of perks, privileges, benefits, and recognition can create a hostile work environment. But, the reality is that for a workplace to be hostile, certain legal criteria must be met. Additionally, the behaviour, actions or communication must be discriminatory in nature.

How to spot a hostile work environment

So, a co-worker who talks loudly, snaps her gum, and leans over your desk when she talks with you, is demonstrating inappropriate, rude, obnoxious behaviour, but it does not create a hostile work environment. On the other hand, a co-worker who tells sexually explicit jokes and sends around images of nude people, is guilty of sexual harassment and creating a hostile work environment.

A boss who verbally berates you about your age, your religion, your gender, or your race may be guilty of creating a hostile work environment. This is especially true if you asked the individual to stop and the behaviour continues.

You can read some of our tips for creating a positive working environment over here.  For anyone who may need help dealing with a difficult situation regarding behaviour in the workplace, visit reachout.com for advice.

Or… why not just change job? Take a look at some of our great new roles if you have become tired with your job: www.3qrecruitment.ie/home/Source: humanresources.about.com

Tips for a Positive Work Environment

I love my job.  Here are some tips for a positive working environment (if you don’t) because there’s nothing worse that working in a job you hate, or worse, in a hostile work environment. A workplace that is trusting, open and fun will be the most productive and successful. It’s all about the company culture.
Tips for a positive working environment

1. Engage in meaningful (and in-person) dialogue

When you make the effort to connect with your team members in person—individually and as a group—you’re establishing a position of caring that motivates individuals in all sorts of crazy-good ways. It’s easy to send short messages in emails, and then rely on these small exchanges for most of your communication. Or, you can focus on what needs to get done next and forget to take a breath, look around, and get to know your employees. Don’t fall into this rut. Instead, ask your team members about their immediate goals and project interests as well as their career objectives.

Also, remember: We’re all human, and most humans respond well to the real thing—in-person communication that says “you matter.”

2. Show your appreciation

One of the biggest complaints from employees is that they don’t feel appreciated. It takes no effort to say “thank you” for example. They are the two most underrated words in the dictionary.  The second someone gives us a “nice job” or “you made a difference on this project,” it makes us feel like we matter in a way that gives our work a sense of purpose. If you’re not so inclined to give out verbal gold stars, an easy place to start is with a simple “thank you.”

The next step is to give meaningful appreciation. Thread the high-fives and “nice jobs” with a more detailed picture behind your acknowledgment. This way, your employees can understand what they’re doing well, and do more of it. Also, detailed praise shows you’re paying attention and not throwing around empty phrases. When people feel like they’re doing good work, they want to rise to the occasion even more.

3. Listen to everyone’s ideas

Your entire team has great ideas. They’re in the trenches all day, bringing their own experience and perspectives to the part of the project they’re focused on. For example, if there’s a way to make spreadsheets more efficient or cold-calls more productive, the team members know how. It’s tempting to stick with protocol because you know that works well. But these days the world moves so fast nobody can afford to stay with a status quo for too long. So instead, make it a policy to listen to new ideas (you could structure appropriate time periods for this, too), and this will tell everyone they’re a valuable part of the team. Give the good ideas a try; you never know what might happen—other than the team becomes more invested in their work and the project outcome, for starters.

4. Trust your team members

This is a harder rule to practice for some more than others. So try to default to the assumption that your team is made up of adult, responsibility-taking, competent workers that don’t need to be treated like children. (In the end, people act the way they’re treated.) In action terms, this means that when you delegate, really let go and let the individual own the task you gave them. You can also communicate trust by asking team members to make decisions for their part of the project, like:

  • Suggesting when and if meetings should happen
  • Anticipating road blocks and communicate those to the group
  • Assuming that your team wants the best for the project. And if you sense the beginnings of some negative juju kicking up, invite  discussions about office policy; see what the majority thinks.

5. Be spontaneous and have a little fun

Everyone wants to have fun at work—even though everyone defines “fun” a little differently. Still, if you can keep the previous four tips in action, then fun—or a sense of enjoyment and being able to be yourself at work—becomes a more natural part of everyone’s job. Fun happens when  people feel well-connected with a team where there’s mutual respect, open communication, acceptance of who people are and everyone’s collaborating and working toward the same goal. When teams are working well together, it makes it easier to be spontaneous and have some fun – whether it’s a last-minute Football Friday party after a project launch, or a brief pause in the afternoon to tell stories and have a few laughs over topics that have nothing to do about work.

Source: www.liquidplanner.com/blog/5-ways-to-create-a-positive-work-environment/

Back to Study While Working Full-Time

Back to Study While Working Full-Time

As employers demand an increasing range of skills in their employees and continuing professional development is becoming more important, many professionals are going back to college to get the specific expertise they need for a new job, for a promotion, or, in some cases, to retain their current position. Once you have decided why you want to go back to study, you need to be prepared.  Work life balance will never be more important as you try to balance study life with work life.  Here is a short list of what you need to organise:

back to study while working full time

1)     Talk to your manager – Before making a decision about what to study or where to attend, get some advice from your manager about how your continuing professional education can contribute to the success of the company.

2)     Talk to your colleagues who have gone back to school – Discussing your plans with colleagues who have experience with returning to school will give you a better idea about what to expect and what to avoid.

3)     Come up with a time management plan – Draw up a time budget that will help you figure out when you can study given your work and family commitments.

4)     Ensure that your commitment to your course doesn’t overshadow your commitment to your job – While your employer might be supportive of your decision to go back to school they still expect you to be fully productive on the job.

5)     Align your course work with your career work – Most academic programs should have enough flexibility and discretion in assignments that will give you opportunities to tackle work-related projects or problems.

6)     Develop a professional network with your classmates – Don’t skimp on the social side of college or school, getting to know your classmates and professors will expand your network, and may be a big chunk of the upside of going back to school.

Source: www.forbes.com